Title III

Title III at Meharry

Purpose

 

The Title III Institutional Aid Program is intended to equalize educational opportunities for disadvantaged students by assisting eligible colleges and universities.  Eligible institutions are Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs), Historically Black Graduate Institutions (HBGIs), and other institutions with limited financial resources that serve a high percentage of students receiving need-based federal financial assistance. This federal program currently provides assistance to more than 350 postsecondary institutions. Grant funds may be used to improve academic programs, student services, institutional management, and financial stability.  At the institutional level, a wide range of activities has been funded under these umbrella objectives.  Even within a single institution, Title III funds are typically used to support more than one activity – the number of funded activities changes from year to year.

 

Mission

 

The core mission of the Meharry Title III Office is to serve as the central administrative office for the management of the Title III funded activities.  The office assists the college by ensuring planning, management, budgetary and administrative oversight, technical assistance and evaluation of each activity.  These functions, when applied in concert with other campus administrative activities, strengthen the total infrastructure of the College.  Additionally, the office serves as a liaison between Meharry Medical College and the U.S. Department of Education.

The Title III Office must interlock the institutional perspective and comprehension of the institution’s mission, goals and objectives with the Strengthening of Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) Program and the Strengthening of Historically Black Graduate Institutions (HBGIs) Program in order to affect long range plans for utilization of Title III funding.

Assessment & Evaluation

The Title III Office actively utilizes feedback from our stakeholders to constantly improve and provide the best possible service.

 

Based on our past experience, the survey will take approximately 5 minutes to complete.

 

Click here to start the survey

 

If you have any questions about the survey or any difficulty with the link please contact Title III at titleiii@mmc.edu or by calling 615.327.6683.  Finally, thank you for providing your feedback. We appreciate the time you have taken and will actively use it to improve our service to you.

Events

FY18 Quarterly Report Due Dates

  • First Quarter – (Oct/Nov/Dec) – Due March 30
  • Second Quarter – (Jan/Feb/Mar – Due April 20
  • Third Quarter – (Apr/May/June) – Due July 13
  • Fourth Quarter – (July/Aug/Sept) – Due October 12

Please submit all Quarterly Reports to: titleiii@mmc.edu

 

FY18 Quarterly Meeting Schedule

  • First Quarter – April 3rd @ 2:00 p.m.
  • Second Quarter – June 4th @ 2:00 p.m.
  • Third Quarter – August 20th @ 2:00 p.m.
  • Fourth Quarter – November 5th @2:00 p.m.

Title III Scholars

At the 2014 National Association of Title III Administrators Technical Assistance Conference, Title III grantees were asked to place increased focus on the competitiveness of our institutions, the cost of education at our institutions and the aggregate loan indebtedness of our students upon graduation.  Since that time, Meharry Medical College has provided first year tuition support to medical, dental and graduate study students.

The individuals below are the 2018-2019 Cohort of Meharry Medical College Title III Scholars.

School of Medicine Title III Scholars

Aisha Suara

Bolivar, Tennessee

Harvard University

Mirjana Ivanic

Mountain View, California

University of California-Berkley

Nebiyat Zewdie

Silver Springs, Maryland

University of Maryland-Baltimore

Trevor Thompson

Arlington, Texas

Baylor University

Paul Francois

Fort Myers, Florida

University of South Florida

Kayla Massey

Windsor Mill, Maryland

Howard University

School of Dentistry Title III Scholars

Jasmin Gosey

Gretna, Louisiana

LSU Baton Rouge

Michael Gipson

Sikeston, Missouri

Rhodes College

School of Graduate Studies and Research Scholars – MSPH

Policies & Procedures

The Strengthening Historically Black Graduate Institutions (HBGI) Program provides grants to assist institutions in establishing and strengthening their physical plants, development offices, endowment funds, academic resources and student services so that they may continue to participate in fulfilling the goal of equality of educational opportunity in graduate education. Subject to the availability of funds, the Secretary shall award program grants to institutions determined by the Secretary to be making a substantial contribution to the legal, medical, dental, veterinary, or other graduate education opportunities in mathematics, engineering, or the physical or natural sciences for Black Americans.

Allowable Activities (HBGIs)*

A grantee may carry out the following activities under this part:

  • Purchase, rental, or lease of scientific or laboratory equipment for educational purposes, including instructional or research purposes;
  • Construction, maintenance, renovation, and improvement in classroom, library, laboratory, and other instructional facilities, including purchase or rental of telecommunications technology equipment or services;
  • Purchase of library books, periodicals, microfilm, and other educational materials, including telecommunications program materials;
  • Tutoring, counseling, and student service programs designed to improve academic success;
  • Funds and administrative management, and acquisition of equipment for use in strengthening funds management;
  • Establishing or improving a development office to strengthen or improve contributions from alumni and the private sector;
  • Scholarships, fellowships and other financial assistance for needy graduate and professional students to permit the enrollment of the students in and completion of the doctoral degree in medicine, dentistry, pharmacy, veterinary medicine, law, and the doctorate degree in the physical or natural sciences, engineering, mathematics, or other scientific disciplines in which African Americans are underrepresented;
  • Acquisition of real property in connection with the construction, renovation, or addition to or improvement of campus facilities;
  • Education or financial information designed to improve the financial literacy and economic literacy of students or the students’ families, especially with regard to student indebtedness and student assistance programs;
  • Services necessary for the implementation of projects or activities that are described in the grant application and that are approved, in advance, by the Secretary, except that not more than two percent of the grant amount may be used for this purpose;
  • Establishing and maintaining an institutional endowment under 34 CFR part 628 to facilitate financial independence.

Unallowable Activities (HBGIs)*

A grantee may not carry out the following activities under this part:

  • Advertising;
  • Public Relations Costs;
  • Alcohol;
  • Alumni Activity Costs;
  • Bad Debts;
  • Local Civil Defense Project Costs not on Institution’s Premises;
  • Commencement and Convocation Costs;
  • Institution-furnished Automobile Costs for Personal Use;
  • Contingency Provision Costs;
  • Defense and Prosecution of Criminal and Civil Proceedings, Claims, Appeals and Patent Infringement Costs;
  • Depreciation Reserves Costs;
  • Donations or Contributions;
  • Entertainment Costs (includes amusement, diversion & social activities)
  • Executive Lobbying Costs;
  • Insurance Costs to Protect against Defects in Institution’s Materials or Workmanship;
  • Interest, Fund-Raising and Investment Management Costs;
  • Lobbying Costs;
  • Losses on Other Sponsored Agreements;
  • Membership Costs in Civic Clubs, Community Organizations, Country Clubs, Social or Dining Clubs or Organizations;
  • Pre-agreement Costs Prior to Effective Date of Agreement;
  • Recruiting Costs for Help-Wanted Advertising;
  • Selling and Marketing Costs of Products or Services of the Institution;
  • Severance Costs in Excess of Institution’s Normal Severance Pay;
  • Activities that are not included in the grantee’s approved application;
  • Activities described in paragraph (a)(12) of this section that are not approved by the Secretary;
  • Activities that are inconsistent with any State plan of higher education that is applicable to the institution;
  • Activities that are inconsistent with a State plan for desegregation of higher education that is applicable to the institution;
  • Activities or services that relate to sectarian instruction or religious worship; and
  • Activities provided by a school or department of divinity. For the purpose of this section, a “school or department of divinity” means an institution, or a department of an institution, whose program is specifically for the education of students to prepare them to become ministers of religion or to enter upon some other religious vocation, or to prepare them to teach theological subjects.

 

No award under this part may be used for telecommunications technology equipment, facilities or services, if such equipment, facilities or services are available pursuant to section 396(k) of the Communications Act of 1934.
(Authority: 20 U.S.C. 1062, 1063a, and 1069c)

*taken from the PART 609‑STRENGTHENING HISTORICALLY BLACK GRADUATE INSTITUTIONS PROGRAM

For the full document, click here.

Additional Regulations & Policy Resources

2015 Annual Achievement Report

The Annual Performance Report for Meharry Medical College as presented outlines the goal attainment and substantial progress made in achieving the Title III first year stated performance measures from October 1, 2014 through September 30, 2015.

 

Highlighted below are the major program milestones that fulfilled the legislative intent this fiscal year.

 

Meharry Medical College supported four full-tuition scholarships for high-performing fourth-year students. Aggregate loan indebtedness, student engagement/leadership and academic achievement were among the criteria considered in awarding The Presidential Student Leadership Scholarships.

 

The School of Medicine Scholar is a fourth-year student from Miami, Florida who is seeking a residency in Family Medicine. In the top 1% of her class with an earned GPA of 3.8636, this Scholar’s desire to pursue medicine began in high school when she fell in love with how the body works. The opportunity to impact a person’s health is what drives her to practice medicine. She has made the commitment to serve the underserved. As such, this Scholar desires to pursue a career in academic medicine inspiring the next generation of health professionals to consider primary care.  Special accomplishments include service to the American Association of Medical Colleges as an Officer of Student Representatives, selection into the Arnold P. Gold Humanism Honor Society, and senior selection into the prestigious Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Medical Society. Demonstrating her engagement and leadership, the School of Medicine Scholar served on the Pre-Alumni Association as Student-At-Large, Executive Vice President and Community Day Chair and the Student Vice President to Alumni Affairs, in addition to chairing the 2016 Match Day Committee.

 

The School of Dentistry Scholar is a fourth-year student from Akron, Ohio pursuing a career in Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery. This Scholar earned the highest GPA in her cohort at 3.7143. She realized at an early age that she wanted a career that allowed her to give back to the community, leave an imprint and improve society – one that bridges the gap between her artistic interests and love for healthcare. Her vision is to be a shining star example in the community raising dental health awareness, and advocating for comprehensive dental treatment to address overall health, teeth and finances.

 

As evidence of her leadership, the School of Dentistry Scholar served as President and Treasurer of the Student National Dental Association, Class of 2016 SOD Academic Vice President and Pre-Alumni Association Vice President, and Chair of the Community Day.

 

Full tuition support also recognized the achievements of two Master of Science in Public Health Scholars in the School of Graduate Studies and Research.  Both School of Graduate Studies and Research Scholars boast 4.0 GPAs in their programs of study.

 

One scholar, from Horn Lake, Mississippi, has served as the Corresponding Secretary for the Pre-Alumni Association and Photographer of The Meharrian Yearbook.  The second Scholar, from Madison, Alabama, is the MSPH Representative to the Graduate Student Association and Parliamentarian of the Division of Public Health Practice Student Association (DPHPSA).  These Scholars have maintained an exceptional level of excellence in pursuit of their health professions education. Both intend to enter the field of Dentistry.

 

Throughout its storied legacy, Meharry Medical College has trained students whose families had limited financial resources. Today many of the College’s students are classified under federal guidelines as financially disadvantaged. Nearly 90% of all Meharry students receive some form of financial assistance to finance their education.

 

The total cost of attendance for a four-year dental or medical student at Meharry exceeds $300,000. Many students incur staggering debt and rely heavily on student loans in various forms. The result is that far too many Meharry students begin their career with substantially larger amounts of accumulated debt compared to their peers.

 

Despite this disproportionate financial burden, more than 65% of Meharry graduates choose to serve in disadvantaged and underserved communities. This legacy of service by Meharry alumni – indeed, this moral imperative and passion to serve at-risk populations – is what first attracts many to Meharry, and this same tradition inspires them to return to those communities that need them most.

 

This cohort of Scholars are among a generation of health professionals poised to impact lives of those they will treat and serve and address health disparities – a national imperative.

 

Providing direct support to students through Title III resources, the USDE has empowered Meharry Medical College to touch the lives of these students, their patients and in essence, the future.The intent of the Institutional Advancement activity is to support the College’s Strategic Plan of strengthening the fiscal position of the College through increasing scholarship funds available for student education. Further, the activity is cognizant of the Department’s focus on increasing the College’s competitiveness and reducing the loan indebtedness of students upon graduation.

 

With a stated goal of $2,000,000, the Advancement activity nearly doubled the amount of support for student scholarships with $3,804,653 in-hand and pledged scholarship support.  Additionally, the objective achieved 100% of its goal regarding the provision of 10 (ten) professional development training sessions for staff.

 

The Construction, Maintenance and Renovation activity met its program objectives by reducing emergency repairs by 50% as compared to 2007 and facilitating a 10% decrease in energy cost/consumption rates as compared to FY2014.  Additionally, the activity renovated seven (7) classrooms, laboratories and study areas, exceeding the goal of 5 (five) classrooms or 4,000 square feet. Enhancing institutional sustainability, the Construction activity also initiated a phased LCD lighting project to improve security on campus in areas with high student traffic. There has been a realized energy cost avoidance of $4.2 million over a five year period through conservative energy management.

 

The Center for Educational Development and Support (CEDS) enhanced its Peer Tutor Program by conducting tutoring sessions in the Gross Anatomy Laboratory with trained tutors. The activity met the stated objective of preparing first-year students to enhance course and subject board performance leading to increased pass rates on national standardized certification examinations by providing academic support services and has made measurable and observable contributions to the student learning outcomes and timely progression to graduation.

 

The library activity was designed to provide digital library resources for the institution to support the academic programs, research, and teaching and learning processes at Meharry through library instructional sessions, training on hand-held devices and medical apps, and the addition of new hardware and software to streamline digital operations.  Efficiency of the digital library was increased by decreasing the error rate to five percent (5%) from the baseline of six percent (6%).  Additionally, 15 (fifteen) group training sessions were held, exceeding the training session goal by 125%.

 

The School of Graduate Studies and Research provided support to two programs, the Master of Science in Public Health and the Doctor of Philosophy program in the biomedical sciences by increasing the number of highly qualified students admitted to the two programs.  The SOGSR was able to provide stipend support for four (4) Ph.D. candidates pursuing terminal degrees in the biomedical sciences. The School was also successful in placing eight (8) Master of Science in Public Health (MSPH) students in externships with organizations across the state, nation and internationally in the summer of 2015,thus meeting all objectives.

 

The School of Medicine provided enriching environments ensuring and sustaining academic excellence and professional competency in all academic programs by enhancing and strengthening the quality of instructional programs. The program objectives were met through the objectives outlined in the grant proposal.  The SOM exposed more than 513 students and residents to medical simulation via a state-of-the-art medical simulation center. The total average for the Clinical subject board scores increased from 70.83% to 72.17% over the last year. There was an increase in the scores of 5 of the 6 medical disciplines tested: 4% improvement in Pediatrics and Psychiatry, 2% in Internal Medicine and Surgery, and a 1% improvement in Obstetrics & Gynecology. The activity exceeded the goal of exposing 20% of SOM students to a diverse patient base with the expansion of training sites by exposing 52% of SOM students to a diverse patient base. The students rotated across five (5) medical specialties:  Internal Medicine, OB-Gyn, Pediatrics, Psychiatry and Surgery.

 

The School of Dentistry activity increased the entering student mean GPA from 3.17 to 3.23 and the mean Dental Aptitude Test (DAT) scores from 17 to 17.8. Performance on national dental licensure examinations improved in 2015. The first-time taker pass rate for 2015 on the National Board of Dental Examination (NBDE) was 94.7%, exceeding the goal of 90%.  The first-time taker pass rate on the NBDE Part II fell slightly below goal at 84.9%.

 

Institutional researchers utilized the Centralized Institutional Research Reporting System (CIRRS) captured the following alumni physician and dentist practicing information for the assessment of the fulfillment of Meharry’s mission:  Of the 3,864 medical and dental graduates in years of 1975 – 2013, 83% were practicing in disadvantaged communities. In addition, the College had a higher percentage (56%) of medical and dental graduates practicing in primary care than the national figure of 43%. The research findings indicated that the medical and dental graduates from the College were upholding the College’s mission of training primary care professionals to serve disadvantaged communities. In addition, the Office of IR conducted the USMLE Step 1 prediction model for the School of Medicine. The prediction results from the simulation model could help the school build a consensus that (1) MCAT Physical Science and Biological Science scores are significant predictors of USMLE Step 1 performances; and (2) the school should continue its efforts in admitting medical students with high MCAT Physical Science and Biological Science scores. The Admissions Committee could screen the qualified student applicants for interviews based on the study results of sensitivity analysis.  Furthermore, the Office of IR assisted the Schools of Medicine and Dentistry assessing their program effectiveness based on graduating student survey results.  Most medical student respondents agreed that the medical curriculum was coherent and compatible with Meharry’s mission.

2014 Annual Achievement Report

The Annual Performance Report for Meharry Medical College as presented outlines the goal attainment and substantial progress made in achieving the Title III second year stated performance measures from October 1, 2013 through September 30, 2014.  The 13 activities provide synergy with key components of the College’s strategic plan to ensure the mission of improving health care for underserved communities is executed through a commitment to service excellence, innovative and integrated healthcare teaching and research opportunities.

 

Highlighted below are the major program milestones that fulfilled the legislative intent this fiscal year.

 

The intent of the Institutional Advancement activity was to support the College’s Strategic Plan of strengthening the fiscal position of the College through increasing alumni giving participation, raising dollars for facilities, infrastructure, and increasing scholarship funds. The College was able to exceed the stated two-year facilities goal ($5,000,000) by raising $5,458,672. Although the two-year alumni participation rate did not meet its goal of 17% over the two-year period, the participation rate did increase from the baseline of 15% to 15.54%. Scholarship funding for students more than doubled the objective goal of $2 million, totaling $4,692,451.

 

The Construction, Maintenance and Renovation activity met its program objectives by reducing emergency repairs by 50% as compared to 2007 and facilitating a 10% decrease in energy cost/consumption rates as compared to FY2013.  Additionally, more campus areas are being monitored by the Department of Safety and Security and the daily appearance of the campus exceeds community standards, with manicured landscaped and clean exterior building surfaces. There has been a realized energy cost avoidance of $4.2 million over a five year period.

 

The Center for Educational Development and Support (CEDS) activity met the stated objective of preparing first-year students to enhance course and subject board performance leading to increased pass rates on national standardized certification examinations. The Center achieved this milestone by providing academic support services and measurable and observable contributions to the student learning outcomes and timely progression to graduation. This contribution is evidenced by student subject board and licensure certification examinations, student learning outcomes and graduation rates achieved by the Schools of Medicine and Dentistry.

 

The Library activity was designed to provide digital library resources for the institution to support the academic programs, research, and teaching and learning processes at Meharry through Library instructional sessions, training on hand-held devices and medical apps, and the addition of new hardware and software to streamline digital operations. One hundred percent of the 2nd and 3rd year Internal Medicine residents received iPads and were trained to access point-of-care resources from the digital library.  Efficiency of the digital library was increased by decreasing the error rate to five percent (5%) from the baseline of six percent (6%).  Additionally, forty-four (44) group training sessions were held, exceeding the training session goals by forty-six percent (46%).

 

The School of Graduate Studies and Research provided support to two programs, the Master of Science in Public Health and the Doctor of Philosophy program in the biomedical sciences by increasing the number of highly qualified students admitted to the two programs.  The SOGSR was able to provide stipend support for four (4) Ph.D. students, thus meeting an objective. The School also successfully met all of the Council on Education in Public Health accreditation standards prior to the 2014 CEPH reaffirmation deadline.

 

The School of Medicine provided enriching environments ensuring and sustaining academic excellence and professional competency in all academic programs by enhancing and strengthening the quality of instructional programs. The program objectives were met through the objectives outlined in the grant proposal.  The number of community training sites for students increased from two (2) to six (6) surpassing the goal of four (4). The diversity of the patient base was also achieved by students rotating through 59 clinical sites across six (6) medical specialties. The number of rural community sites increased from one (1) to two (2), meeting the performance goal.  The pass rate on the United States Medical Licensure Examination Steps 1 and 2 improved by 5% and 12% respectively.

 

The School of Dentistry activity focused on enhanced student performance outcomes on licensure examinations and the timely graduation of its students.  The SOD met is goals by significantly increasing the first-time taker pass rate on the National Board of Dental Examination (NBDE) Part I and Part II since 2012.  The performance on Part I exceeded the goal (90%) in both 2013 and 2014 (93%). The goal of a 90% pass rate for Part II was exceeded (93%) in 2013. The pass rate for Part II in 2014 was two percentage points below the target.

 

The Institutional Research (IR) activity achieved 100% of its stated objectives. IR was instrumental in preparing the fifth year Interim regional accreditation report for the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges. IR provided support to the institution’s strategic planning process, M-PACT 2009-2014 and the related outcome reports.  Support was also provided for the updated strategic plan, M-PACT 2.0 Meharry’s Plan for Action 2014-2016.

Student & Campus Impact

Activity I Academic Quality

(SOGSR, SOM, SOD, Library)

This activity is designed to strengthen the College’s academic programs.  The Library will present a minimum of twelve (12) instructional classes to the Meharry community during the 2014-2015 grant year. Evidence-based training, Dental Informatics, and research writing will also be offered annually to respective students as part of curricular support offered by the Library.  Through this funding, Meharry Medical College’s strong record of graduating Master of Science in Public Health (MSPH) program professionals as well as Ph.Ds. in biomedical science disciplines, many of who enter academic institutions where they continue the tradition of teaching, research and service that is a part of our mission will be strengthened. The School of Medicine students’ educational training will be enhanced by exposing a minimum of 20% of the students to a diverse patient base via the expansion of opportunities in a variety of community. A minimum of 10% of School of Medicine students will also be exposed to evidence-based medical training in a clinical setting.  This funding will also strengthen Meharry’s legacy of training the largest number of African-American dentists. The College focuses on training young men and women from a diverse background, with an emphasis of African-Americans and other underrepresented minority groups from disadvantaged backgrounds.

Activity II Student Services and Outcomes

(Student Financial Aid/Student Financial Services, CEDS, Scholarship Awards)

The new cycle of Title III funding will provide the necessary means for Meharry to improve its processes and bring the Offices of Student Financial Aid (OSFA) and Student Financial Services (SFS) in alignment with the goals and objectives required for participation in the federal student loan programs.  OSFA and SFS desire to provide impeccable services. The funding of this activity will assist the College in meeting these goals.  This activity also addresses academic support for students through the Center for Educational Development And Supportthatserves all students of the three schools comprising Meharry Medical College, offering a variety of services to students and faculty to support improved student learning, timely progression toward graduation and life-long learning and professional development activities designed to support institutional faculty.  To ensure scholarship support for deserving students, this activity will provide the structure and resources to support select students from enrollment to graduation.

Activity III Financial Performance

(Advancement, Financial Planning & Analysis)

Title III funding is essential to strengthening Meharry Medical College’s operating capacity so the College can increase urgently needed scholarship resources to help students meet the high cost of graduate and professional education and help reduce the education debt they must incur. Through staff professional development and enhanced record-keeping and reporting processes, this increased capacity will enable the College to better achieve a priority goal of generating greater endowment resources and gift income to assist students in great financial need.  The Office of Financial Planning and Analysis is proactively engaged in all aspects of major strategic analyses, the operating budget and is a key resource for the Senior Vice President for Finance & Chief Financial Officer.  In this role, the Office is responsible for the development and management of the College’s annual operating and capital budgets, as well as supporting the College’s strategic planning and operations through reporting and continuous monitoring of revenue and expenses utilizing multi-year trends, forecasts and ad hoc analyses.

Activity IV Institutional Management

(Institutional Research, Information Technology/Academic Computing, Construction Maintenance & Renovation, Compliance)

Title III funding is essential to strengthening Meharry Medical College’s operating capacity so the College can increase urgently needed scholarship resources to help students meet the high cost of graduate and professional education and help reduce the education debt they must incur. Through staff professional development and enhanced record-keeping and reporting processes, this increased capacity will enable the College to better achieve a priority goal of generating greater endowment resources and gift income to assist students in great financial need.  The Office of Financial Planning and Analysis is proactively engaged in all aspects of major strategic analyses, the operating budget and is a key resource for the Senior Vice President for Finance & Chief Financial Officer.  In this role, the Office is responsible for the development and management of the College’s annual operating and capital budgets, as well as supporting the College’s strategic planning and operations through reporting and continuous monitoring of revenue and expenses utilizing multi-year trends, forecasts and ad hoc analyses.

Responsibilities of Activity Directors

An Activity Director is a steward of Federal funds

The Activity Directors are responsible for carrying out the approved plan of operation and spending plan for their respective activities and for achieving the objectives of their activities. Only Activity Directors may initiate requests for funds, and the requests must be based upon the approved budget, as aligned with the stated objectives. Each Activity Director will have requests approved by the appropriate administrator within the exiting administrative structure of the College before the requests are transmitted to the Title III Office.

 

What must Activity Directors do?

  1. Comply with applicable Federal statutes, regulations, and guidelines on Federal grant administration, Title III Projects, student privacy rights (i.e., GEPA and FERPA);
  2. Comply with College and Title III Office guidelines, policies and procedures;
  3. Ensure that expenditures of Title III funds are allocable, reasonable, allowable, consistently treated and necessary under 2 CFR 220 (formerly 0MB Circular A-21 guidelines);
  4. Administer, supervise, and closely monitor progress of the Title III Activity;
  5. Diligently work to accomplish the objectives of the approved Activity;
  6. Use sound fiscal internal control and accounting procedures to ensure proper disbursement of Title III funds;
  7. Prepare and submit accurate and timely Quarterly Reports, Time and Effort reports, Annual Performance Reports, and other periodic reports;
  8. Label all Title III equipment and maintain an equipment log;
  9. Prepare for and be available for external evaluations, audits, and program reviews as deemed necessary by the Title III Office;
  10. Attend Title III meetings and technical assistance workshops;
  11. Maintain proper recordkeeping and retention of records sufficient to establish an audit trail. When in doubt, keep it!

 

For a current listing of Title III Activity Directors, click here.